My wish-list for the next YAML July 28, 2021 on Drew DeVault's blog

YAML is both universally used, and universally reviled. It has a lot of problems, but it also is so useful in solving specific tasks that it’s hard to replace. Some new kids on the block (such as TOML) have successfully taken over a portion of its market share, but it remains in force in places where those alternatives show their weaknesses.

I think it’s clear to most that YAML is in dire need of replacement, which is why many have tried. But many have also failed. So what are the key features of YAML which demonstrate its strengths, and key weaknesses that could be improved upon?

Let’s start with some things that YAML does well, which will have to be preserved.

What needs to be improved upon?

Someday I may design something like this myself, but I’m really hoping that someone else does it instead. Good luck!

⇒ This article is also available on gemini.

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